Criminology


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL SCHOOL OF SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT SOCIAL POLICY
LEVEL OF STUDIES LEVEL 6
COURSE CODE 18 SEMESTER 3Ο
COURSE TITLE CRIMINOLOGY
TEACHING ACTIVITIES
If the ECTS Credits are distributed in distinct parts of the course e.g. lectures, labs etc. If the ECTS Credits are awarded to the whole course, then please indicate the teaching hours per week and the corresponding ECTS Credits.
TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS CREDITS
3 6
Please, add lines if necessary. Teaching methods and organization of the course are described in section 4.
COURSE TYPE

Background, General Knowledge, Scientific Area, Skill Development

Background
PREREQUISITES:

 

TEACHING & EXAMINATION LANGUAGE: Greek
COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS: No
COURSE URL: https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OKA120/
  1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning Outcomes
Please describe the learning outcomes of the course: Knowledge, skills and abilities acquired after the successful completion of the course.
Students are expected:

·         to identify the multidimensional factors that transform the crime phenomenon in the context of specific historical conditions,

·         to obtain the basic knowledge so that they can understand the differences among different approaches to crime, and

·         to develop skills of comparative and critical analysis of the problems associated with the crime phenomenon.

The course is the basis for students to attend other criminological sciences lessons taught in the Department and to examine issues of crime and its control, connecting them with the subject of these courses, namely “Criminology”, “Crime Policy and Globalization”, “International and Greek Penitentiary Policy”, “Penal  Phenomenon and Formal Social Control”, “Security and Human Rights”, “Youth, Crime and Penal Repression”,”Victimology and Restorative Justice”, “Special Issues of Criminal Justice and Crime Policy”.  Through the teaching of these subjects, students acquire the necessary basic knowledge on theoretical and applied criminology, including a wide range of measures introduced and implemented to prevent and control crime. Moreover, students are prepared for a more systematic engagement with criminological sciences later on, at postgraduate level.

General Skills
Name the desirable general skills upon successful completion of the module
Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information,

ICT Use

Adaptation to new situations

Decision making

Autonomous work

Teamwork

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project design and management

Equity and Inclusion

Respect for the natural environment

Sustainability

Demonstration of social, professional and moral responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Critical thinking

Promoting free, creative and inductive reasoning

 

Adaptation to new situations

Decision making

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Equity and Inclusion

Critical thinking

Promoting free, creative and inductive reasoning

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
Criminology is a science that examines formal and informal rule-breaking, the reasons (causes) and the terms of rule-breaking and social reaction to it. Therefore, it  deals with crime as an individual or collective act, as an issue of interpersonal relations, as a social and political problem. In particular, Criminology, through research and analysis of social reality at micro-, medium- and macro-level, examines the causes and conditions of violation of the law, the criminalisation of an act, the social construction of crime and their consequences.

The subject of the course is to develop and critically analyze the theoretical paradigms and trends of Criminology, as they evolved from the emergence of the discipline to the present, combined with the examination of the socio-political factors which influenced respective theories and the consequences of different theoretical approaches to the implementation of crime policies.

The course introduces students to the central theoretical questions as well as to the basic social problems that various theoretical schools seek to solve and, finally, to the basic proposals formulated over time to resolve or settle the crime question from a critical epistemological perspective .

In particular, the main issues of crime theories, the questions raised by these theories and the proposed solutions based on different philosophical and sociological backgrounds (Classicism, Positivism, Critical Theory) are addressed. The rational criminal and free will, criminal determinism, the criminal environment, social interaction and the social construction of crime, the political economy of crime and the critique of criminal law and power relations, the collapse of high expectations for the eradication of crime, neoconservative tendencies and the radical and critical approach, realisms in the approach to crime are the main units of the course.

The course is structured in three major sections. First, students are introduced to the key issues, concepts and problems examined by criminological theories. Secondly, the theoretical tradition of Criminology in Modernity, the so called “Big Theories” based on the belief that crime can be eliminated is discussed. The third section examines left and right realist and managerial approaches to crime as transformations of the major theoretical paradigms of the past, as well as new theoretical trends in Criminology.

  1. LEARNING & TEACHING METHODSEVALUATION
TEACHING METHOD
Face to face, Distance learning, etc.
Face to face
USE OF INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (ICT)
Use of ICT in Teaching, in Laboratory Education, in Communication with students
Use of ICT in teaching to download documentaries, interviews and use of PPT in classes, use of e-class for posting teaching material, announcements, exercises and other educational activities  and for communicating with students.
TEACHING ORGANIZATION

The ways and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, Seminars, Laboratory Exercise, Field Exercise, Bibliographic research & analysis, Tutoring, Internship (Placement), Clinical Exercise, Art Workshop, Interactive learning, Study visits, Study / creation, project, creation, project. Etc.

 

The supervised and unsupervised workload per activity is indicated here, so that total workload per semester complies to ECTS standards.

Activity Workload/semester
Lectures 39
Interactive teaching 15
Drafting a paper or participation in educational activities 30
Independent study-Research an

d preparation for the exams

55
Presentation of a Study-Research

 

9
Final Written Examination

 

2
COURSE TOTAL (25 HOURS OF WORKLOAD PER CREDIT UNIT) 150
Student Evaluation

Description of the evaluation process

 

Assessment Language, Assessment Methods, Formative or Concluding, Multiple Choice Test, Short Answer Questions, Essay Development Questions, Problem Solving, Written Assignment, Essay / Report, Oral Exam, Presentation in audience, Laboratory Report, Clinical examination of a patient, Artistic interpretation, Other/Others

 

Please indicate all relevant information about the course assessment and how students are informed 

Written exams, 100% or in combination with the optional drafting and oral presentation of papers on specific issues of the lectures, in consultation with the instructors.

 

  1. SUGGESTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
Basic:
Vidali, S., 2013. Introduction to Criminology. Athens: Nomiki Vivliothiki (in Greek)Additional:

Alexiadis, S., 2011. Criminology. Athens – Thessaloniki: Sakkoula (in Greek)

Archimandritou, Μ., 2020. Introduction to Criminology. Athens – Thessaloniki: Sakkoula (in Greek)

Chaidou, A., 1996. Positivist Criminology. Aetiological approaches to the criminal phenomenon. Athens: Nomiki Vivliothiki (in Greek)

Daskalakis, H., 1985. The Criminology of Social Reaction. Athens – Komotini: A.N. Sakkoulas (in Greek)

Dimopoulos, Ch., 2008. Contributions to Criminology. Athens: Nomiki Vivliothiki (in Greek)

Gasparinatou, M. (2020), Dangerousness: The development of a “dangerous” construction. Criminological approach, Athens: TOPOS Publications (in Greek)

Gasparinatou, M. (2020), Juvenile delinquency and Crime policy, Athens: Nomiki Vivliothiki (in Greek)

Lazos, G., 2007. Critical Criminology. Athens: Nomiki Vivliothiki (in Greek)

Panoussis, G., 2009. Physiognomy. A contemporary criminological approach. Athens – Komotini: AN. Sakkoulas (in Greek)

Spinellis,C.D., 2014. Criminology. Contemporary and Older Directions. Athens: Nomiki Vivliothiki (in Greek)

Farsedakis, I., 1991. The Social Reaction to Crime and its Limits. Athens: Nomiki Vivliothiki (in Greek)

Zarafonitou, Ch., 2004. Empirical Criminology. Athens: Nomiki Vivliothiki (in Greek)

Burke, H. R., 2009. An Introduction to Criminological Theory. Devon, Oregon: Willan Publishing

DeKeseredy, W., 2011. Contemporary Critical Criminology. London and New York: Routledge

Liebling, A., Maruna, S. & McAra, L. (eds), 2017. The Oxford Handbook of Criminology. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Lea, J., 2002. Crime and Modernity: Continuities in Left Realist Criminology. London – Thousand Oaks – N. Delhi: Sage

Lilly, J.R., Cullen, F.T. & Ball, R.A., 2010. Criminological Theory. Context and Consequences. Thousand Oaks – London – New Delhi: Sage

Taylor, I., 1999, Crime in Context. A Critical Criminology of Market Societies. Cambridge – Oxford: Polity Press & Blackwell

Taylor, I., Walton, P. & Young, J. (eds), 1975 (2011). Critical Criminology. Routledge Revivals, New York: Routledge

Young, J., 2007. The Vertigo of Late Modernity. London: Sage

Young, J., 2011. The Criminological Imagination. Cambridge: Polity Press

 

 

ANNEX OF THE COURSE OUTLINE

 

Alternative ways of examining a course in emergency situations

 

Teachers (full name): Nikolaos Koulouris, Associate Professor and Margarita Gasparinatou, Assistant Professor
Contact details: nkoulour@sp.duth.gr, mgaspari@sp.duth.gr
Supervisors: (1) No
Evaluation methods: (2) Drafting two small papers in the form of answers to questions from a list of topics (100% of the total grade, 50% of 5 units each).

 

Implementation Instructions: (3) The examination of the course takes place according to the examinations programme, announced by the Secretariat of the Department of Social Policy. Before the exams, students must have registered in e-class with their academic account, otherwise they are excluded. On the day of the exam, the topics of the exam are posted in the field ASSIGNMENTS-EXERCISES, and the students are asked to answer and submit their answers in a file format (word), within the predetermined time of the exam. The answers are submitted in the field “ASSIGNMENTS-EXERCISES” of e-class. During the examination, students can use bibliographic sources, as the topics require critical thinking and deep understanding of the topics.

 

The papers and presentations students prepare during the semester are taken into account as supporting the grade of the written exams (an up to 3 points bonus). For the bonus grade to be added, students are required to obtain a passable grade in the written examinations (at least 5 out of 10).

 

Throughout the examination students can communicate with the teachers through the electronic platform at the link of the course. On the same platform, students who are eligible to be examined orally and have declared it to the secretariat, are examined on the same topics of the written examinations.

 

  • Please write YES or NO
  • Note down the evaluation methods used by the teacher, e.g.
  • written assignment or/and exercises
  • written or oral examination with distance learning methods, provided that the integrity and reliability of the examination are ensured.
  • In the Implementation Instructions section, the teacher notes down clear instructions to the students:

 

  1. a) in case of written assignment and / or exercises: the deadline (e.g. the last week of the semester), the means of submission, the grading system, the grade percentage of the assignment in the final grade and any other necessary information.
  2. b) in case of oral examination with distance learning methods: the instructions for conducting the examination (e.g. in groups of X people), the way of administration of the questions to be answered, the distance learning platforms to be used, the technical means for the implementation of the examination (microphone, camera, word processor, internet connection, communication platform), the hyperlinks for the examination, the duration of the exam, the grading system, the percentage of the oral exam in the final grade, the ways in which the inviolability and reliability of the exam are ensured and any other necessary information.
  3. c) in case of written examination with distance learning methods: the way of administration of the questions to be answered, the way of submitting the answers, the duration of the exam, the grading system, the percentage of the written exam of the exam in the final grade, the ways in which the integrity and reliability of the exam are ensured and any other necessary information.

There should be an attached list with the Student Registration Numbers only of students eligible to participate in the examination.

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